Curriculum vitae of Dr Nasruddin Jaafar
2005 SEAMEO-Jasper Research Awardee

1. Name: Dr Nasruddin Jaafar Sex: Male
2. Nationality: Malaysian  
3. Date of Birth: 7 August 1959 Place of Birth: Melaka, Malaysia
4. Maliling Address

Office:
Department of Community Dentistry
Faculty of Dentistry
University of Malaya
50603 Kuala Lumpur
Malaysia

Residence:
No 45, Jalan USJ 2/5K
47600 Subang Jaya, Selangor
Malaysia
Telephone: +60 (3) 7967-4860; 7967-4805 +60 (3) 8024-7955
+60 (012) 624-2695
Fax: +60 (3) 7967-4532 E-mail: nasrudd@um.edu.my
5. Academic Background
Year attended
Institution
Degree obtained (Major field)
1977-1982 University of Cairo , Egypt

Bachelor of Dental Surgery
(BDS, Cairo)

1984-1985 University of London , England

Master of Science
MSc London (Dental Public Health)

1985 The Royal College of Surgeons of England Diploma in Dental Public Health, DDPHRCS
(Eng.) (Dental Public Health)
1992-1993 University of Dublin , Ireland

Master of Science
MSc Dublin (Community Dentistry)

1997-1999

University of Malaya

Doctor of Philosophy
PhD Malaya (Community Dentistry)

6. Professional Background
Year employed
Agency/Institution
Position/Designation
1982-1984 Faculty of Dentistry, University Malaya

Tutor

1985-1993 Department of Preventive Dentistry, University Malaya

Lecturer

1994-2003 Department of Community Dentistry, University Malaya Associate Professor

2003-present

Department of Community Dentistry, University Malaya

Professor

2001-2004

Department of Community Dentistry, University Malaya

Head of Department

2005 Faculty of Dentistry, University Malaya Head of Dental Informatics Unit
7. Other Research and Publications (Completed over the past FIVE years)
 

THESIS

1. JAAFAR N (1985).

The philosophy of dentistry: its relevance to underdeveloped countries. MSc Dissertation. University of London, England.

2. JAAFAR N (1993).

The relationship between normative, perceived and expressed dental needs: development of a sociodental index measuring dental health status. MSc Thesis. University of Dublin, Ireland.

3. JAAFAR N (1999).

Evaluation of the outcome of dental care services among Malaysian secondary school children. PHD thesis. University of Malaya.

 

PAPERS & ABSTRACTS

  1. Rohana AK , JAAFAR N. “The pattern of caries attack and implications for caries control in 16-year-old schoolchildren (in Perlis)”. Journal of Dental Research, 1999; 78(5) Abstract No.34: pg 1174.
  2. JAAFAR N , Nor GM. The prevalence of post-extraction complications in an outpatient dental clinic in Kuala Lumpur Malaysia – a retrospective survey. Singapore Dent J 1999; Vol XXIII (No.1) Suppl: pg 1-5.
  3. Loh KH, Mahrusah J, JAAFAR N, Razak IA. “A study of the effectiveness of a preventive dental program for pre-school children in Johor Bahru Malaysia”. Journal of Dental Research 1999; 78(5); Abstract No.23; p 1172.
  4. Lim SC, JAAFAR N, Razak IA. “A retrospective study of the fate of the first permanent molars in 12-year-old children in Kota Tinggi Johor Malaysia.” Journal of Dental Research, 1999; 78(5); Abstract No.1: p 1170.
  5. JAAFAR N , Razak IA. “The Relationship between the prevalence of oro-facial pain and normative oral health status in 12-13 year-old schoolchildren in Malaysia”. Journal of Dental Research 2000; 79(5): Abstract No. 45; p1321.
  6. Saub R & JAAFAR N. “Oral health beliefs and practices among traditional healers in an Orang Asli community in Sungkai Perak.” Journal of Dental Research 2000; 79(5): Abstract No. 44; p1321.
  7. Saub R, JAAFAR N. A dental anthropological study of health and illness behaviour among Orang Asli (aborigines) of the Semai tribe: The perspective of Traditional Healers. Medical Journal of Malaysia Dec 2001; 56 (4): 401-407.
  8. JAAFAR N, Razak IA. The prevalence and impact of oro-facial pain among 12 year-old schoolchildren in an epidemiological survey setting. Annals Dentistry Univ Malaya 2002; 9: 11-16.

PAPERS PRESENTED (PROCEEDINGS OF CONFERENCES)

  1. JAAFAR N, Saub R. Oral Health Status Of Orang Asli School Children Of The Semai Tribe In Pos Jernang Perak. Proceedings of the International Association for Dental Research Malaysian Section 1 st scientific meeting, Kuala Lumpur 16 Sept 2000 ; Abstract No 17; pg 22.
  2. Amdah M, JAAFAR N. Fluoride Toothpaste Utilization Behaviour Among Preschool Children In Banting Selangor.
  3. Proceedings of the International Association for Dental Research Malaysian Section 1 st scientific meeting, Kuala Lumpur 16 Sept 2000 (Abstract No. 3, page 15).
  4. JAAFAR N , Razak IA. Oro-Facial Pain Prevalence As A Proxy Measure Of Quality Of Life. Proceedings of the 7 th World Congress on Preventive Dentistry, April 24-27, 2001 Beijing China. Abstract No. P139; p160 -161.
  5. Suhaila Mat Said, Siti Norhaiza Ibrahim and NASRUDDIN JAAFAR. Pharmacists and Traditional Medicine Practitioners attitudes and knowledge towards the use of fluoride toothpaste. Proceedings of the Fourth Students Scientific Conference 25-26 October 2002, Abstract No P12 pg 35.
  6. Jaafar N. Oral health promotion for school children in Malaysia – Country Report. Conference proceedings of papers presented at the 2 nd Asian Conference of Oral Health Promotion for school children in Ayutthaya Thailand, 21-23 Feb 2003.
  7. Tahir Z, Doss J, JAAFAR N. “Smokeless tobacco habits in a Bajau community in Sabah. Presented at the 18 thInternational Association for Dental Research South East Asian Division Conference at Caravelle Hotel, Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam. 25-27 Sept 2003. Abstract of Proceedings Abstract No. V08, Pg 31.
  8. Tahir Z, Doss J, JAAFAR N. “Betel quid chewing in a Bajau community”. Presented at the 18 thInternational Association for Dental Research South East Asian Division Conference at Caravelle Hotel, Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam. 25-27 Sept 2003. Abstract of Proceedings Abstract No. V24, Pg 39.
  9. Budi AMS, Nurul Huda H, Jaafar N. (2003). Evaluation of oral health messages in the primary school curriculum in Malaysia. Proceedings of the 5 th Dental Students Scientific Conference held at the Faculty of Dentistry, University Malaya. 5-6 Disember, 2003. (Abstract No L4; Pg. 20).
  10. Jaafar N , Wan Hussein WS, Manaf ZA, Omar K, Ahmad J. (2004) Child-to-child oral health promotion program – a qualitative evaluation. Presented as a poster presentation at the82nd. International Association for Dental Research at Hawaii Convention Center, Honolulu Hawaii March 10-13, 2004. (Abstract No 1970 in Program Book, and Journal of Dental Research Vol 83, Special Issue A, CD-ROM of Abstracts, 2004)
  11. Abu Hassan MI, Raja Latifah RJ, JAAFAR N, Razak IA. (2004). University Malaya dental graduates competencies: graduates perception. Paper presented at the Inaugration of Preclinical Building and National Symposium on Dental Education. 9-10 July 2004 (Abstract pg 14).
  12. Razak IA, Raja Latifah RJ, Abu Hassan MI, JAAFAR N. (2004). University Malaya dental graduates competencies: employers perception. Paper presented at the Inaugration of Preclinical Building and National Symposium on Dental Education. 9-10 July 2004 (Abstract pg 15).
  13. Wei LC, Pau LH, JAAFAR N. (2004). Awareness of sugar-free confectionery among mothers in Bukit Mertajam Penang. 6 th. Dental Students Scientific Conference 10-11 Dec 2004. Abstract No P2, pg.28.
  14. Raja Latifah RJ, Razak IA, Abu Hassan MI, JAAFAR N. (2004). Dental graduates competency in the provision of holistic care. 36 th. APACPH Conference Brisbane Australia, 3 Dec 2004. (Abstract)
  15. AM Khairiyah, MN Wan, B Rugayah, JG Doss, JAAFAR N. (2005) Cross-cultural adaptation of the Geriatric Oral Health Assessment Index (GOHAI) into Malay: methods and processes. 27 th. Asia Pacific Dental Congress, Kuala Lumpur 25-29 May 2005. (Abstract).
  16. JAAFAR N , Khalib O, Jabbar A, Wan Sabri WH, Zulkifli M. (2005). The Junior Doctors Health Promotion Program - A Process Evaluation. 20 th. Annual Scientific Meeting of International Association for Dental Research SEA Division. Melaka Equatorial Hotel 1-4 September 2005. Abstract No IO-25, pg 60.

8.
Please share your views on how your work as a researcher could be enhanced by winning the SEAMEO-Jasper Research Awards
 

Every child needs health education. The problem is how to disseminate messages in the school setting in the most effective and cost-efficient way. We must admit that health professionals are too few to make an impact. Other ingenious ways must be found. Incorporating it into the official curriculum is one way to achieve this. However this is often paid lip service. A supplementary program that involves their active participation and interaction is needed. Ideally we should design such programs that build upon their existing skills and meet the customers wants through the concept of empowerment in order to be sustainable.

However, translating theory into action and trying to make things work in the “real” world situation, faced with constraints of shortage of professional manpower resources, conflicting objectives and demands between different stakeholders, trying to fit into existing policies - is another key challenge. The Junior Doctor Program for primary schools in Malaysia was designed more than 15 years ago as a small pilot project in a relatively poorly developed state. It evolved and grew in acceptance in two pioneer states and finally in 2004 this model was accepted for the whole nation. What has made this model so successful and sustainable?

As an academic researcher at the University of Malaya, we support the development of pragmatic, time-tested and practical models of delivery of health education and promotion in schools, especially primary schools through consultations and implementing ideas from affected stakeholders. The final format evolved naturally, until it is accepted by all stakeholders and thus self-sustainable in the long term.

I have followed through this program since its inception by the pioneer co-authors in the 1990’s, advocated, advised and evaluated the program. I am convinced that other countries in the SEA region can gain from sharing the success story as well as avoiding the pitfalls. I think this is a practical and pragmatic model of health education and promotion that can easily be adapted to developing SEA countries facing mounting health problems and a shortage of health educators.

It is different from other models of health education in that its primary objective has somewhat evolved into the development of human capital, communication skills and leadership development in the schools - but using the dissemination of health messages as a tool. The main vehicle is the children themselves - using the child-to-child peer education method and to act as agents of change. This is a school-based program involving the smart partnership between the Ministry of Health, Ministry of Education and the University of Malaya which have been proven appropriate.

It accepts the concept that health is a merely a tool for everyday living and not the objective of living. By developing the school children’s practical life skills such as leadership, teamwork, public speaking and communication skills under the guidance of teachers and health personnel - we develop not only healthy individuals and communities but also marketable personal skills. Our research showed that these are the impacts of the program appreciated most by the major stakeholders viz. the teachers, parents and children themselves. The health educators are happy that the health message has been delivered across. This is what makes this program unique and special.

Thus if I win the SEAMEO Jasper Research Award, I wish:-

1) to explain the concept, implementation and evaluation of this model of health education and promotion in primary schools to other member countries, and

2) to share this experience with donor countries. I am willing to be a consultant should any member country wish to adopt or adapt this model in their own countries.

3) Finally by winning this international recognition, I hope to convince the authorities in my own country to support the continuation of this program. I must prove that this is a worthwhile program to support financially and administratively, since there are signs that frustration is creeping on teachers when they perceive lack of funding support from relevant Ministries.

9. The Research Entry
 

Descriptive Title:

Evaluation of a school based child-to-child health education and promotion program for health security, disease prevention and overall well-being: The Junior Doctor Program in Malaysia

Research Team Members (Names, Institutions and nature of participation):

  1. Prof Dr Nasruddin Jaafar (Principal Researcher)
    Department of Community Dentistry
    Faculty of Dentistry
    University of Malaya
    50603 Kuala Lumpur
  2. Mohamad Khalib b Omar BSc (Implementing Agency)
    Head, Health Promotion Unit, Kelantan State Health Department
    Lot 129-130 Taman Maktab
    Pengkalan Chepa 16100
    Kota Bharu, Kelantan
  3. Abdul Jabbar b Ahmad BSc (Implementing Agency)
    Head, Health Promotion Unit, Pahang State Health Department
    Level 12, Wisma Persekutuan
    Jalan Gambut 25000
    Kuantan, Pahang
  4. Dr Wan Sabri b Wan Hussein (Advisor)
    Department of Policy and Business Strategy
    Faculty of Business and Accounting
    University Malaya
    50603 Kuala Lumpur
  5. Prof Dr Zulkifli b A Manaf (Advisor)
    Department of Educational Psychology and Counselling
    Faculty of Education
    University Malaya
    50603 Kuala Lumpur

 

10.
Other prizes, awards or citations received (please cite year and award-giving body)

Behavioral Science & Health Services Research - Best Research Paper Award 2005
By: International Association for Dental Research (SEA Division)
Winner of USD500 cash award at its 20 th. Annual SEA Division Scientific Meeting in Malacca Equatorial Hotel, September 1-4, 2005.

Date started: June 2003 Date completed: June 2005

Study Site(s)/ Locale: Kelantan state, Malaysia

Implementing Agency / Unit:

  1. Mohamad Khalib b Omar BSc (Implementing Agency)
    Head, Health Promotion Unit, Kelantan State Health Department
    Ministry of Health Malaysia
    Lot 129-130 Taman Maktab
    Pengkalan Chepa 16100
    Kota Bharu, Kelantan
  2. Abdul Jabbar b Ahmad BSc (Implementing Agency)
    Head, Health Promotion Unit, Pahang State Health Department
    Ministry of Health Malaysia
    Level 12, Wisma Persekutuan
    Jalan Gambut 25000
    Kuantan, Pahang

Funding Agency (if any):

Research funded by University of Malaya Research Grant Vote No. F0717/2003B.

11.
Briefly discuss relevance of the research project towards improving education in Southeast Asia
 

Health is an asset to South-East Asia’s relatively young population. Education is the key to reach our maximum human potential. Health and education are not separate issues. The process of education is hampered if health problems are not resolved. Thus health and education are basic needs and should be regarded as a basic human right. Every child should not be deprived of basic health education. That should be the agreed basis.

However how can basic health education be delivered to all schoolchildren within the education system? That is the problem. We have a large population with very few precious professional medical personnel. It is impossible for professional medical staff to educate the whole schoolchildren population. Hence the need for (1) integration of health education into the formal education curriculum, and (2) integration of health education into its co-curriculum to support the former.

Any country can organize a one-off campaign that is often forgotten beyond its launching day. The government feels they have educated the public. What is lacking is a health education delivery model that keeps the health agenda in schools continually alive, run by the consumers themselves and covering all issues of health relevant to that country. In Malaysia, the Dr Muda (lit. Junior Doctors) Program creates this child friendly learning environment using the impartation of health messages as an agent to meet the expectations of teachers, parents and the children.

The uniqueness of this model is that:

  1. it imparts the knowledge concerning health issues to schoolchildren, by schoolchildren - while developing personal skills to the brightest pupils in public speaking, teamworking, leadership and effective communication. The potential students identified in each school are the jewels of South East Asia’s future human capital. Thus it benefits not only education per se but also health education for the masses. South East Asia has a bright future waiting to be discovered if we can develop our young human capital successfully with health knowledge as well as valuable character building personal skills as a value-added product, and
  2. this is a tried and tested method that has evolved and matured over a period of 15 years. Thus this is not a theoretical enterprise. Since SEA system of education share similar characteristics, Malaysia’s experience is also relevant to them. The process of education is improved while health messages are also delivered.

 

12. Briefly discuss how the research project may contribute towards a better understanding between Canada and Southeast Asia
 

Canadian researchers, volunteers and educators frequently come into contact with SEA organizations (both NGO’s and GO’s) in various capacities. They have often powerful voices which local policymakers listen to. Often the failure to understand the limitations of the “system” within which we work, bearing in mind the sensitivities, perceived needs, economic and political constraints - lead to recommended solutions more suitable to a western population with different ideals. Home grown solutions do not seem to be popular.

This research project highlights what is acceptable and highly prized expectations by the stakeholders in the school system. Using that as a starting point health, education methods are tailor made to fit into the existing system so that it is self running and sustainable in the long run.

Canadians can better understand the SEA stakeholders concerns through these research findings. Local officials can better understand why this project deserves to be supported financially so that it is further strengthened. As it is now there are signs of frustration among the front line teachers and providers of health education that they are not getting enough support from both education and health authorities. Neither agency seems to want to own the program and fund it despite the fact that it is relatively cheap but effective way to deliver health education. Canada can contribute support for this idea by (1) helping to fund such initiatives in the SEA region, (2) lend legitimacy by giving foreign support that this is a worthwhile program to consider., and (3) help to propagate this model as one of the possible health education models for other poor countries in the SEA region to reach out to their school children population.

 

 

Prof. Dr Nasruddin Jaafar
BDS, MSc, DDPHRCS, PHD.
Professor of Community Dentistry
Faculty of Dentistry
University of Malaya
50603 Kuala Lumpur
MALAYSIA

 

 

Last updated: 9 February, 2006  

Top


Contact Us:  library@seameo.org
SEAMEO Secretariat, Mom Luang Pin Malakul Centenary Bldg.,
920 Sukhumvit Rd., Bangkok 10110, Thailand.  
Tel +66 (0) 2391-0144, +66 (0) 2391-0256, +66 (0) 2391-0554 Fax +66 (0) 2381-2587